How To Store Gas At Home (And Does Gas Go Bad?)

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Storing gasoline at home can be a convenient way to have fuel on hand for emergencies or for use in outdoor equipment.

However, it is important to store gasoline safely and properly to avoid accidents and ensure that the fuel remains usable.

In this blog post, we will discuss the best practices for storing gasoline at home, including how to store it, where to store it, and how long it lasts.

How to Store Gasoline at Home

The American Petroleum Institute recommends that gasoline be stored in an approved container or tank.

Gasoline containers should be tightly closed and handled gently to avoid spills.

Gasoline is a flammable liquid and should be stored at room temperature, away from potential heat sources such as the sun, a hot water heater, space heater, or furnace, and at least 50 feet away from ignition sources, such as pilot lights.

When storing gasoline, it is important to take the following precautions:

  • Check your local and state governments for standards and regulations on gasoline storage. Fire codes and regulations restrict the amount of gasoline an individual homeowner can store (usually no more than 25 gallons), in approved containers of less than five gallons capacity each
  • Store gasoline in a well-ventilated area, such as a detached, enclosed garage or barn, protected from the elements
  • Do not store gasoline inside your home, as the vapors are too dangerous. An attached garage is typically okay if the rest of the criteria is met. Stay far away from heaters, fireplaces, sources of sparks, sunny windows, etc.
  • Use an approved container or tank to store gasoline
  • Keep gasoline containers tightly closed and handle them gently to avoid spills
  • Do not smoke where gasoline is handled or stored
  • Put gasoline in a small engine (like a lawnmower) only when the engine and attachments are cool
  • Use a static-free siphon or funnel when refilling to avoid static electricity from igniting the fuel, and pour it in a slow, controlled manner

Where to Store Gasoline

The ideal place to store gasoline is somewhere protected from the elements yet separate from your home.

Detached, enclosed garages and barns are perfect.

Keep your fuel tanks stored in a garage or shed, in a well-ventilated area.

Be sure your tanks are not in direct sunlight, and keep them away from any other sources of heat, such as space heaters and your vehicles’ exhaust pipes.

How Long Does Gasoline Last?

Standard gasoline has a relatively short shelf-life.

It starts degrading in a month, and most people avoid using gas once it’s 6-12 months old.

In general, pure gas begins to degrade and lose its combustibility as a result of oxidation and evaporation in three to six months, if stored in a sealed and labeled metal or plastic container.

Ethanol-gasoline blends have a shorter shelf life of two to three months.

Fuel stabilized gasoline can last for up to two years if stored in a cool, low-oxygen environment.

If you add a fuel stabilizer, you can multiply the lifespan and keep gas stored for a few years. Gasoline should be kept in an airtight container.

You should always label when the gas was purchased and stored.

Keep gas in a cool, low-oxygen environment.

If your stored gas becomes exposed to oxygen, it will start to degrade and lose its combustibility.

Does Gasoline Go Bad?

Gasoline can go bad if it is not stored properly.

Over time, gasoline can degrade and lose its combustibility, making it difficult to start engines or causing them to run poorly.

In addition, gasoline can become contaminated with water or other substances, which can cause damage to engines.

In general, pure gas begins to degrade and lose its combustibility as a result of oxidation and evaporation in three to six months, if stored in a sealed and labeled metal or plastic container.

Ethanol-gasoline blends have a shorter shelf life of two to three months.

Fuel stabilized gasoline can last for up to two years if stored in a cool, low-oxygen environment.

Conclusion

Storing gasoline at home can be a convenient way to have fuel on hand for emergencies or for use in outdoor equipment.

However, it is important to store gasoline safely and properly to avoid accidents and ensure that the fuel remains usable.

Remember to store gasoline in an approved container or tank, keep it in a well-ventilated area, and label when the gas was purchased and stored.

Keep gasoline away from potential heat sources and ignition sources, and do not smoke where gasoline is handled or stored.

By following these guidelines, you can safely store gasoline at home and ensure that it remains usable for when you need it most.

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